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US DR. KING: WHO AT ODDS WITH JAPANESE MERCURY STUDIES

November 6, 2012

By Ulla Danielsen, journalist, DK-Copenhagen

A recent report issued by WHO’s Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety is more about supporting the current status quo with respect to WHO-recommended vaccines than about providing scientifically rigorous advice on vaccine safety issues to the public.

So says US-based analytical chemist Dr. Paul G. King, who has reviewed the entire report.  Dr. King is Science Advisor for Coalition for Mercuryfree Drugs (CoMeD).

The WHO safety-debate took place on June 6-7 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Here the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety met to review several specific topics, among others, the safety of thiomersal, a highly toxic mercury-containing compound used as a  vaccine preservative.

One of the WHO’s points of view stated in the report is that “ethyl mercury is efficiently excreted in the stools and does not accumulate over the long-term in blood, since levels returned to baseline within 30 days of vaccination”.

However, here WHO’s Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety is at odds with Japanese mercury studies from 1968 and 1971, as Dr. Paul G. King points out.

According to King, the Japanese radiolabeled (203Hg) studies by Takeda Y, et al. (1968) and Takahashi T, et al. (1971) tell another and less comfortable story about the safety of thiomersal.

RATS STUDIED IN

BOTH STUDIES

After a single ethylmercury chloride dose, in rats, the studies do not support either rapid or complete elimination via the stools of radiolabeled (203 Hg) mercury species from the 203Hg-labelled ethyl-mercury compound administered to rats.

MONKEYS STUDIED BY

TAKAHASHI T, ET AL.

The monkeys studied by Takahashi T, et Al. did not excrete most of the mercury in the dose administered in the stools (faeces) and urine.

Though the mercury rapidly left the blood, eight days after dosing, the mercury was still accumulating in the brain and the kidneys of the monkeys studied.

The Japanese study also revealed that the concentration in the monkey’s brain tissue samples (0.96 to 1.68 micrograms of mercury per gram of brain tissue) was higher eight days after dosing than the initial specific dose given to the monkeys (0.80 micrograms of mercury per gram of animal body weight).

posted by blog nbjour

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